Free Seminar on Dementia, Alzheimer’s Disease & Parkinson’s – August 5th

JOIN US FOR AN EDUCATIONAL SEMINAR
focused on key research for advanced memory loss and central nervous system disorders, specifically dementia, Alzheimer’s
disease and Parkinson’s disease. Hear from two medical experts—Dr. Juebin Huang, Associate Professor at University
of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC) Mind Center and Dr. Natividad Stover, Associate Professor at University of
Alabama, Birmingham on their research and the progress that has been made in the field.

Juebin Huang, MD
Dr. Huang’s clinical practice is focused on general neurology with a special interest in neurodegenerative and movement disorders such as Alzheimer’s
disease, Parkinson’s disease, Tremor, Vascular dementia, and Mild Cognitive Impairment. His research interests include exploration of experimental
therapeutics for Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases and the study of Neuroimaging biomarkers for aging and dementia. Dr. Huang is a member
of the American Academy of Neurology.

Natividad Stover, MD
Dr. Stover specializes in neurology, movement disorders, Parkinson’s disease, deep brain stimulation, and dystonia. Dr. Stover is affiliated with Birmingham
VA Medical Center and the University Of Alabama Hospital.

READ MORE HERE

 

Special Guest Speaker – Joe Woods, Storyteller, May 23

Joe was born to Bradford and Rubye Woods in the small Mississippi Delta town of Richey. He attended and graduated from Anguilla High School and from Mississippi State University. After college graduation, he worked in the Sierra Nevada Mountains on the Tahoe National Forest near Lake Tahoe, California. After two years, he returned home and worked for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg District, serving thirty-eight years until his retirement in 2003. He served in the Mississippi Army National Guard for twelve-years.  He and his wife, Mary Anne, moved to Raymond four years ago to be near their daughter and two grandsons Hawkins and Holden. They are members of the Raymond United Methodist Church. Joe is a staff writer for three monthly newspapers; Southwest Rankin, Hinds County News and Byram Banner. He writes a column titled, “Front Porch Ramblings”. His hobbies are growing a vegetable garden and wood working.

Come hear his stories and have a cup of coffee and a muffin.

  • Date: May 23, 2017
  • Time: 10:00a.m.
  • Place: St. Catherine’s Village, 200 Dominican Drive, Madison, MS 39110
  • Cost: FREE!
  • RSVP: 601-856-0123

Annual Ladies Pajamas & Pancakes – May 25

PJ’s are optional, but encourage! Breakfast will be served. Come join, we’ll be flippin’ up some fun.

  • Date: May 25, 2017
  • Time: 9:30a.m.
  • Place: Activity Room, St. Catherine’s Village, 200 Dominican Drive, Madison, MS 39110
  • Cost: FREE!
  • RSVP: 601-856-0123

5 Signs That Indicate Your Loved May Need Memory Care

At first, they forget little things like where they placed their keys or someone’s birthday. That’s natural—it happens to everyone as they age. How do you know when the forgetfulness is becoming a bigger issue that may require memory care support? Other signals that something serious may be wrong include agitation, disruption in sleep, personality changes, and even delusions. Ask yourself the following questions to determine if your loved one may need memory care that is beyond what you can provide.

Early Signs Of Dementia Or Alzheimer’s Disease
Are your loved one’s finances in order? Are bills going unpaid? Has he or she made unusual purchases? Has your loved one become vulnerable to scams and sweepstakes? Experts say that an early sign of dementia is the inability to understand money, debt, credit, and contracts. That’s because the disease impacts cognitive skills, problem solving and judgment.

Has her physical appearance changed? If you notice that your family member has lost weight, it may be because she has no appetite or is forgetting to eat. The opposite also can occur—she may forget that she has already eaten and then eat again. Is she no longer well groomed? Some patients with dementia or Alzheimer’s neglect their hygiene, either because they simply forget or because they are apathetic. The disease affects procedural memory, which is the ability to carry out certain routine actions such as bathing, dressing, brushing teeth, medication management, and more.

Behavioral Changes As The Disease Progresses
Does your loved one appear confused or disoriented? Does he wander off and then not know where he is? More than 60 percent of people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s or dementia wander. Since the disease destroys brain cells responsible for not only memory but also thinking and behavior, they often get lost even in a familiar setting.

Has his behavior become unpredictable? Often, a person with Alzheimer’s or dementia has mood swings and may become aggressive and suspicious for no apparent reason. These shifts in behavior may be caused by physical discomfort and the inability to express it. Or it may be a factor of the environment and being easily confused. Lack of sleep can also contribute to erratic behavior. Sunset and early evening can bring on increased memory loss, confusion, agitation, and anger. This is known as Sundowner Syndrome.

Unsafe Living Conditions
Are you concerned with your loved one’s living conditions? Household issues such as water damage can indicate repeatedly forgetting to turn off the water. Burn marks may mean he left something on the stove too long. Another indicator of a problem is too much or too little food. When shopping, he may not recall what he needs and buy more or not enough. Or perhaps his daily medications are piling up.

If you feel your loved one may be suffering from more than age-related memory loss, don’t hesitate to get help. Great advances are being made in person-centered care for those with advanced dementia and Alzheimer’s. A licensed memory care facility may be the best, and safest, option for your loved one. Click here for more information on Campbell Cove and the Hughes Center at St. Catherine’s Village.

Free Healthy Brain workshop

Nourish Your Noggin Free Educational Workshop

Free Educational Workshop Promoting Brain Health

Join us for an educational series promoting the importance of understanding how to keep our Brains Healthy As We Age. St. Catherine’s and Alzheimer’s Mississippi are partnering to offer various speakers presenting thought provoking information on changing the way we think about brain health. The latest research and information on brain health is covered along with practical strategies for keeping our brains healthy as we age. As the series progresses we will learn what is normal age-related memory loss, warning signs for dementia, diagnosing some-one with dementia and coping strategies for caregivers.

  • Days: 3rd Thursday of every month February-July 2017
  • Time: 10:00a.m.-10:45a.m.
  • Place: St. Catherine’s Village Independent Activity Center, 200 Dominican Drive, Madison, MS 39110
  • Cost: FREE!
  • RSVP: 601-987-0020 or info@alzms.org

Download the following flyer for more information:

Nourish Your Noggin Flyer

7 Ways To Keep Your Mind Sharp

We all have those moments when we forget where we put our glasses, blank on a friend’s name, or discover at the supermarket that we’ve left the shopping list at home.
Such occasional lapses are common, especially once we hit our forties. And while it may be alarming to have a “senior moment” now and then, the good news is that we are not destined to increased memory gaps as we age. Research shows that by keeping your brain healthy with the right diet, and exercising it to keep cognitive function strong, you can boost memory and brainpower. Here are 10 fun, easy things you can do to stay sharp.

Have fish once a week

People who eat fish once a week have a 60% lower risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, according to research by Martha Clare Morris, ScD, an epidemiologist and associate professor of internal medicine at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. The reason is DHA, a type of omega-3 fatty acid found in large quantities in the brain and in cold water species of fish, such as salmon, tuna, and cod. Morris recently found that a weekly seafood-based meal may slow cognitive decline by 10% per year—the equivalent of turning back the clock 3 to 4 years. Try these healthy fish recipes to get your omega-3s. Not a fish fan? Take a bite of these other brain-boosting foods.

Take a daily brain break

When it comes to the brain, the one factor we often neglect is mental stimulation. We are creatures of habit and tend to engage in the same activities and behavior patterns. In fact, the brain “prefers” novelty and unexpected events. When we mentally challenge ourselves on a regular basis, we can maintain good intellectual potential as well as reduce our risk for age-related memory loss. Challenge yourself with our brain games, scientifically developed to give your mind a workout. From Mah Jongg to Sudoku, you won’t know which gave is your favorite until you try them all.

Keep family meetings

If you doubt the power of staying connected, consider this: Experts now believe that socializing, like other forms of mental exercise (such as crossword puzzles), may build cognitive reserve—a reservoir of brain function you draw from if and when other areas of your brain begin to decline. “When you interact with other people, it’s likely that structures in the frontal lobe that are responsible for ‘executive functions’—like planning, decision making, and response control—get fired up,” explains Oscar Ybarra, PhD, associate psychology professor at the University of Michigan. Regular socializing also keeps your brain sharp by reducing cortisol, the destructive stress hormone.

Maximize your workouts

Aside from eating a healthy diet, one of the most important ways to preserve your brain health is through regular exercise. “Cardiovascular activity pumps more oxygen-rich blood to the brain, which is like giving a car a shot of gasoline,” says Thomas Crook, PhD, an expert on cognitive development and memory disorders. With that blood comes nutrients such as glucose, which fuels every cell in the brain. Daily workouts also have long-term benefits. “Cardio exercise strengthens blood vessels and helps prevent illnesses that impair cognitive function, like stroke,” says Crook.

Keep your happy thoughts

Experts know that positive emotions have a beneficial effect on your ability to process information and are linked to better brain health over the long term. In 2007, one study found that people who frequently experience positive emotions were 60% less likely to develop mild cognitive impairment, while another found that older adults with lower levels of chronic stress scored better on memory tests. If you’ve had a bad day, simply press “eject” on your mental DVD player and pop in a feel-good memory instead, says Crook. Think about a time in your life when you were utterly happy. Rehearse the scene as though you were reliving it, complete with the dialogue, sights, smells, and feelings. “The memory itself will spark brain changes that can help turn your mood—and your long term health—around,” Crook explains. If you’re going through a longer rough patch, take heart—new studies show that depression can actually help your mental and emotional health in the long run.

Don’t sweat what you forget

Know what and when to forget. A daily overload of information often makes us think our memory is declining and we have memory loss when in fact it’s simply glutted with too much useless data. Most of the information that comes at us every day is, frankly, not worth remembering. A fit brain will efficiently screen out and discard worthless or meaningless data so it can remember what’s important. For example, the faster you forget your old PIN or access code, the quicker and more accurately you will recall your new numbers. Can’t concentrate? Try these 10 tricks to reboot your brain.

Take a nap

Go ahead, doze off during your lunch break: Napping for as little as 6 minutes can improve your memory, report German researchers. Over the course of 60 minutes, three groups of volunteers stayed awake for the entire hour, got in just 6 minutes of sleep, or took a 30- to 45-minute nap. On a word recall test afterward, all of those who slept outperformed those who didn’t —but surprisingly, the 6-minute nappers did just as well on the memory exam as those who snoozed longer.

Source – Prevention Magazine