Special Screening Of “Buck” Being Held At St. Catherine’s Village

St. Catherine’s Village is hosting a special screening of “Buck” on Tuesday, August 8, 2017 at 2 p.m. in the community’s Independent Living Activity Room.

The movie, which examines the life of celebrated “horse whisperer” Buck Brannaman, has been shown in theaters all over the world and has won more than 25 awards including the Sundance Film Festival Audience Award: Documentary and the Heartland Award for Truly Moving Picture. It also was an Official Selection for the SXSW Film Festival.

The richly textured and visually stunning film follows Buck Brannaman from his abusive childhood to his successful approach to horse training where he teaches people to communicate with the animals through leadership and sensitivity, not punishment. Buck transforms horses—and people—with his understanding, kindness and respect. Hailed as a truly American story about an unsung hero, Buck is about an ordinary man who has made an extraordinary life despite tremendous odds.

Executive producer and director Cindy Meehl will provide an introduction prior to the movie screening and be on hand for a question and answer session afterwards. Inspired by Buck’s compassionate horsemanship and how the human spirit can triumph over violent circumstances, Meehl spent more than two years filming the documentary. She also founded Cedar Creek Productions, LLC.

“We are thrilled to be able to show our residents such a highly acclaimed film but more importantly, to give them the opportunity to interact with the director in an intimate setting,” said Mary Margaret Judy, executive director at St. Catherine’s Village.

Meehl chose St. Catherine’s Village to showcase her film because she has strong ties to the Madison, Mississippi all-inclusive life care community. St. Catherine’s Village offers a mission-focused environment that encourages residents in all levels to enjoy fullness of life, health and faith. It is the first all-inclusive CCRC (Continuing Care Retirement Community) in the state to earn accreditation by CARF-CCAC. This “commitment to excellence” seal signifies that the campus exceeds the standards established by the only international accrediting body for CCRCs.

The property boasts 160 acres of wooded grounds, protected and beautiful outdoor spaces, and unparalleled facilities along with 24-hour on-duty security and a caring staff that offers companionship and resident-centered care.

Living options include independent living in apartments and garden homes, assisted living in Marian Hall, memory care in Campbell Cove and Hughes Center, and skilled nursing in Siena Center. Also recently introduced was skilled nursing dedicated to memory care.

St. Catherine’s Village is a service of St. Dominic Health Services, Inc. and is sponsored by the Dominican Sisters of Springfield, Illinois, who have owned and operated the hospital since 1946. The private, gated community provides the right care at the right time for those in their retirement years.

To reserve a seat at this special screening of “Buck,” call St. Catherine’s Village at (601) 856-0123.

Free Seminar on Dementia, Alzheimer’s Disease & Parkinson’s – August 5th

JOIN US FOR AN EDUCATIONAL SEMINAR
focused on key research for advanced memory loss and central nervous system disorders, specifically dementia, Alzheimer’s
disease and Parkinson’s disease. Hear from two medical experts—Dr. Juebin Huang, Associate Professor at University
of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC) Mind Center and Dr. Natividad Stover, Associate Professor at University of
Alabama, Birmingham on their research and the progress that has been made in the field.

Juebin Huang, MD
Dr. Huang’s clinical practice is focused on general neurology with a special interest in neurodegenerative and movement disorders such as Alzheimer’s
disease, Parkinson’s disease, Tremor, Vascular dementia, and Mild Cognitive Impairment. His research interests include exploration of experimental
therapeutics for Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases and the study of Neuroimaging biomarkers for aging and dementia. Dr. Huang is a member
of the American Academy of Neurology.

Natividad Stover, MD
Dr. Stover specializes in neurology, movement disorders, Parkinson’s disease, deep brain stimulation, and dystonia. Dr. Stover is affiliated with Birmingham
VA Medical Center and the University Of Alabama Hospital.

READ MORE HERE

 

St. Catherine’s Village Celebrates Earth Day With Signed Proclamation By Mayor Mary Hawkins Butler Of Madison, MS

Free Healthy Brain workshop

Nourish Your Noggin Free Educational Workshop

Free Educational Workshop Promoting Brain Health

Join us for an educational series promoting the importance of understanding how to keep our Brains Healthy As We Age. St. Catherine’s and Alzheimer’s Mississippi are partnering to offer various speakers presenting thought provoking information on changing the way we think about brain health. The latest research and information on brain health is covered along with practical strategies for keeping our brains healthy as we age. As the series progresses we will learn what is normal age-related memory loss, warning signs for dementia, diagnosing some-one with dementia and coping strategies for caregivers.

  • Days: 3rd Thursday of every month February-July 2017
  • Time: 10:00a.m.-10:45a.m.
  • Place: St. Catherine’s Village Independent Activity Center, 200 Dominican Drive, Madison, MS 39110
  • Cost: FREE!
  • RSVP: 601-987-0020 or info@alzms.org

Download the following flyer for more information:

Nourish Your Noggin Flyer

St. Catherine’s Village Wins Three Best Of 2016 Awards

St. Catherine’s Village has received three Best Of 2016 Awards from the Clarion-Ledger, part of the USA Today network.

For the second year in a row, St. Catherine’s Village was named Best Nursing Home, Best Assisted Living Facility and Best Retirement Community in Mississippi. The all-inclusive Life Care Community is a service of St. Dominic’s, which also was voted best hospital.

Dubbed “Mississippi’s Official People’s Choice Awards,” Best Of 2016 winners are voted by readers of the Clarion-Ledger, the state’s largest newspaper. Mississippi residents 18 and older are eligible to vote online in numerous categories from beauty and health to services and from dining to sports.

“We are thrilled to be recognized by people within the state of Mississippi, where many of our residents herald from,” said Mary Margaret Judy, executive director at the Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC). “We strive to provide an unsurpassed level of care and a sense of belonging to each and every individual living at St. Catherine’s Village.”

Located on 160 acres in Madison, St. Catherine’s Village is Mississippi’s preeminent Continuing Life Care Community and the first retirement community in the state to earn accreditation by CARF-CCAC. This “commitment to excellence” seal signifies that the campus exceeds the standards established by the only international accrediting body for CCRCs. Furthermore, Campbell Cove and the Hughes Center are both licensed by the State of Mississippi as “Alzheimer’s Assisted Living” facilities.

Adults 62 and older are welcome at St. Catherine’s Village with options that include independent living in apartments and garden homes, assisted living in Marian Hall, memory care in Campbell Cove and Hughes Center, and skilled nursing in Siena Center. In each lifestyle stage, residents pay a monthly fee that covers utilities, services and amenities that make living comfortable, carefree and secure. In addition to unparalleled facilities, St. Catherine’s Village offers a caring staff, companionship, 24-hour on-duty security, protected and beautiful outdoor spaces, and engaging activities along with access to on-site resident-centered care and a mission-focused environment. The ministry encourages residents in all levels to enjoy fullness of life, health and faith.

St. Catherine’s Village is a service of St. Dominic Health Services, Inc. and is sponsored by the Dominican Sisters of Springfield, Illinois, who have owned and operated the hospital since 1946. The private, gated community provides the right care at the right time for those in their retirement years.

With independent living, assisted living, skilled nursing, and assisted living memory care, St. Catherine’s Village provides the right care at the right time for those in their retirement years. For more information, call (601) 856-0123 or log onto www.StCatherinesVillage.com.

Press Release

The Perfect Palette

Art created by residents at St. Catherine’s Village is on display at the Mississippi Museum of Art now through September 4, 2016. The exhibit is free and open to the public.

Paintings were created as part of The Perfect Palette Art Group at St. Catherine’s Village and include submissions in oils, pastels, graphite, and acrylics. Led by Boo Richards, the program includes beginners all the way through virtuosos.

“We are thrilled to have works of art from our residents on display at the museum,” said Mary Margaret Judy, executive director at St. Catherine’s Village, Mississippi’s preeminent continuing life care community. “It gives our group members—and their families—the opportunity to celebrate their artistic achievements.”

The Perfect Palette Art Group is the second in the Mississippi Museum of Art’s Art in Us All: Community Exhibition Series. The exhibition program invites nonprofit organizations in Mississippi to showcase art created by their constituents. It is intended to cultivate creativity in the community for people of all ages and backgrounds while deepening the relationship between the museum and its visitors.

Through this series, the museum develops partnerships with Mississippi nonprofits that incorporate visual art into their social service work. The Perfect Palette Art Group was selected because it is the manifestation of art being used to lift the spirits and challenge the minds of an often underserved population—in this case, seniors.

“The beauty of the Perfect Palette Art Group is the manner in which it serves to renew, resurrect or awaken someone’s potential…from fostering the enjoyment of an accomplished artist who had put the brushes aside to seeing the utter joy of a new artist upon producing that first work of art that makes the heart smile,” said Judy. “The results are many beautiful compositions of art, friendship, holistic wellness, and creativity.”

The Perfect Palette Art Group is one of many enriching activities in which those living at St. Catherine’s Village can participate. The continuing care retirement community encourages residents to stay engaged, energetic and excited, and has an activity director to coordinate a variety of clubs, groups and events.

“Our philosophy is to make available every tool to enhance holistic health, healing and wellness. The creative arts is one such program,” said Judy. “Its focus is on living life to the fullest and maximizing one’s total potential: physically, mentally, socially, spiritually, and educationally.”

Located on 160 acres in Madison, St. Catherine’s Village is a life care community offering the right care at the right time through independent living, assisted living, memory care, and skilled nursing. For more information, call (601) 856-0123 or log onto www.StCatherinesVillage.com.

To view the approximately 40 works of art from St. Catherine’s Village residents, visit the Mississippi Museum of Art at 380 South Lamar Street in Jackson. The museum is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. (Closed Monday.) Find more information at www.msmuseumart.org.

Press Release

 

7 Ways To Keep Your Mind Sharp

We all have those moments when we forget where we put our glasses, blank on a friend’s name, or discover at the supermarket that we’ve left the shopping list at home.
Such occasional lapses are common, especially once we hit our forties. And while it may be alarming to have a “senior moment” now and then, the good news is that we are not destined to increased memory gaps as we age. Research shows that by keeping your brain healthy with the right diet, and exercising it to keep cognitive function strong, you can boost memory and brainpower. Here are 10 fun, easy things you can do to stay sharp.

Have fish once a week

People who eat fish once a week have a 60% lower risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, according to research by Martha Clare Morris, ScD, an epidemiologist and associate professor of internal medicine at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. The reason is DHA, a type of omega-3 fatty acid found in large quantities in the brain and in cold water species of fish, such as salmon, tuna, and cod. Morris recently found that a weekly seafood-based meal may slow cognitive decline by 10% per year—the equivalent of turning back the clock 3 to 4 years. Try these healthy fish recipes to get your omega-3s. Not a fish fan? Take a bite of these other brain-boosting foods.

Take a daily brain break

When it comes to the brain, the one factor we often neglect is mental stimulation. We are creatures of habit and tend to engage in the same activities and behavior patterns. In fact, the brain “prefers” novelty and unexpected events. When we mentally challenge ourselves on a regular basis, we can maintain good intellectual potential as well as reduce our risk for age-related memory loss. Challenge yourself with our brain games, scientifically developed to give your mind a workout. From Mah Jongg to Sudoku, you won’t know which gave is your favorite until you try them all.

Keep family meetings

If you doubt the power of staying connected, consider this: Experts now believe that socializing, like other forms of mental exercise (such as crossword puzzles), may build cognitive reserve—a reservoir of brain function you draw from if and when other areas of your brain begin to decline. “When you interact with other people, it’s likely that structures in the frontal lobe that are responsible for ‘executive functions’—like planning, decision making, and response control—get fired up,” explains Oscar Ybarra, PhD, associate psychology professor at the University of Michigan. Regular socializing also keeps your brain sharp by reducing cortisol, the destructive stress hormone.

Maximize your workouts

Aside from eating a healthy diet, one of the most important ways to preserve your brain health is through regular exercise. “Cardiovascular activity pumps more oxygen-rich blood to the brain, which is like giving a car a shot of gasoline,” says Thomas Crook, PhD, an expert on cognitive development and memory disorders. With that blood comes nutrients such as glucose, which fuels every cell in the brain. Daily workouts also have long-term benefits. “Cardio exercise strengthens blood vessels and helps prevent illnesses that impair cognitive function, like stroke,” says Crook.

Keep your happy thoughts

Experts know that positive emotions have a beneficial effect on your ability to process information and are linked to better brain health over the long term. In 2007, one study found that people who frequently experience positive emotions were 60% less likely to develop mild cognitive impairment, while another found that older adults with lower levels of chronic stress scored better on memory tests. If you’ve had a bad day, simply press “eject” on your mental DVD player and pop in a feel-good memory instead, says Crook. Think about a time in your life when you were utterly happy. Rehearse the scene as though you were reliving it, complete with the dialogue, sights, smells, and feelings. “The memory itself will spark brain changes that can help turn your mood—and your long term health—around,” Crook explains. If you’re going through a longer rough patch, take heart—new studies show that depression can actually help your mental and emotional health in the long run.

Don’t sweat what you forget

Know what and when to forget. A daily overload of information often makes us think our memory is declining and we have memory loss when in fact it’s simply glutted with too much useless data. Most of the information that comes at us every day is, frankly, not worth remembering. A fit brain will efficiently screen out and discard worthless or meaningless data so it can remember what’s important. For example, the faster you forget your old PIN or access code, the quicker and more accurately you will recall your new numbers. Can’t concentrate? Try these 10 tricks to reboot your brain.

Take a nap

Go ahead, doze off during your lunch break: Napping for as little as 6 minutes can improve your memory, report German researchers. Over the course of 60 minutes, three groups of volunteers stayed awake for the entire hour, got in just 6 minutes of sleep, or took a 30- to 45-minute nap. On a word recall test afterward, all of those who slept outperformed those who didn’t —but surprisingly, the 6-minute nappers did just as well on the memory exam as those who snoozed longer.

Source – Prevention Magazine